Collecting Samples at ZRC

About LIGHT

LIGHT reseachers collecting samples
for TB early detection and diagnosis

About LIGHT

LIGHT is a six-year cross-disciplinary global health research programme funded by UK aid, led by LSTM in collaboration with partners in Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Uganda, and the UK. LIGHT aims to support policy and practice in transforming gendered pathways to health for people with TB in urban settings. This will lead to enhanced overall health and well-being, improved socio-economic outcomes, equity, and will contribute to the efforts of ending TB. 

The LIGHT Consortium aims to contribute to real-world change and leave no-one affected by TB in sub-Saharan Africa behind. The research programme strives to enhance global and national policy environments and health systems, enabling a sustainable and equitable access to quality TB services. LIGHT’s approach aspires to reduce the overall TB mortality and morbidity.  

LIGHT is:

  • Generating new evidence to inform gender-responsive policies that are effectively actioned to improve male access to quality TB care, including diagnosis and prevention. This will lead to a) reducing the number of people with TB-related ill health and deaths; b) reducing transmission to the wider community (including to women and children); c) alleviating the financial burden associated with TB for affected individuals and their familiesand; and d) improving health and social outcomes for people living in high TB burden settings.
  • Strengthening the capacity of individuals, institutions, and multiple stakeholders in LIGHT countries to generate, adapt, translate, and utilise evidence, as well as managing research.
  • Engaging strategically with a range of key national, regional, and global stakeholders to ensure that our research is informed, relevant, effectively communicated, and timely for maximum impact. This includes inofrming policy discussions with evidence from LIGHT on how gender-responsive policies can significantly enhance access to TB prevention, diagnosis, and care.

Gender and TB